These are the pop up plankton that sprang out of the journal. These cool origami look just like the veliger larvae we just saw under the microscope.

Hey, Hi, Hello! Today I am following the journal to Conimicut Point Park in Warwick.The explorers made a pop up plankton here that looked just like some of my friends! I wonder if they're in the area?  Let’s go find out!

Conimicut Point

Veliger Plankton

Veliger Plankton

The veliger is the planktonic larvae of bivalve mollusks (clams) and sea snails. This one is seen under the microscope at 40 times its original size.

Barnacle Lavae

Barnacle Lavae

This molt is of a common barnacle larvae in planktonic stage which occurs early in its life cycle.

Barnacle Larvae Cirri

Barnacle Larvae Cirri

A Barnacle larvae's cirri are feathery, jointed legs. All those feathers filter out the water so it can collect its food.

Barnacle Larvae Cirri

Barnacle Larvae Cirri

Those feathery bits are called cirri, that extend out into the water and stiffen when there is a current. When no current, they beat them rhythmically.

Oyster Shells

Oyster Shells

Oysters also filter feed, and can be important in improving water quality. They usually live in reefs that they create, but these are just shells left behind that have washed up on the beach.

Conimicut's Lighthouse

Conimicut's Lighthouse

Conimicut Point lighthouse is an important marker for ships. It marks the end of the Providence River and the beginning of Narragansett Bay.

Sea Lettuce

Sea Lettuce

Sea lettuce is a common marine algae in the bay. It is tolerant of nutrient pollution and can be used as an indicator species to monitor pollution trends.

More Sea Lettuce!

More Sea Lettuce!

Sea lettuce can dry to be white or black in color.

Slipper Limpet Shells

Slipper Limpet Shells

Slipper Limpets are common snail-like creatures found in the mid-bay area. They are often found in stacks as they will grow on top of each other.

Fish Scales

Fish Scales

Fishermen shave the scales off of fish they catch right on the beach.

The explorers left behind this perfect template, so you can make them too!

It's easy as...

1. Save this image

2. Print it out on 8.5"x11" paper

3. Color!

4. Follow the instructions and make your own Pop-up Plankton!

WOW!  Some plankton are so small that thousands of them could fit inside of me. "Plankton" means "drifters", meaning that they are carried along by the current aren't strong enough to swim freely. Plankton can be so small you need a microscope to see them or they can be as big as an ocean sunfish!

Quick tips!

-print on nice, thick card stalk or glue a printed page to bristol board

-use a ruler to help get a crisp bend in the card stalk

-use a small, thin rubber band

Discover

Explore

Dive In

A copepod!!

Copepods are the most abundant and important zooplankton in the bay ecosystem. The feed on phytoplankton and almost all of the other creatures feed on them at some point in there life. 

Fun fact: Copepods move faster than a race car in just one jump!

What's that?

This material is based upon work supported in part by the National Science Foundation EPSCoR Cooperative Agreement #EPS-1004057

Share your thoughts and artwork with us!

Conimicut's Lighthouse

Conimicut Point lighthouse is an important marker for ships. It marks the end of the Providence River and the beginning of Narragansett Bay.